Archive for the ‘gum disease’ Category

Solar Powered Dentistry

October 17, 2010

Found this article on the internet and thought it was interesting!!

Solar Powered Toothbrush Could Make Toothpaste Obsolete

by Yuka Yoneda, 08/16/10

solar powered toothbrush, solar toothbrush, Kunio Komiyama, shiken, Soladey-J3X, green gadgets, solar power, green design, eco design, sustainable design, green products

When we first saw this new gadget, we thought “Oh, a mechanical toothbrush powered by the sun.” But that isn’t what this is. Instead of using solar rays to charge itself up, the toothbrush uses them to catalyze a powerful chemical reaction that could leave your mouth way cleaner than regular old brushing does. “You see complete destruction of bacterial cells,” says Kunio Komiyama, the inventor of the device. Oh, and did we mention that no toothpaste is required? Watch out Colgate!

solar powered toothbrush, solar toothbrush, Kunio Komiyama, shiken, Soladey-J3X, green gadgets, solar power, green design, eco design, sustainable design, green products

Mechanical University of Saskatchewan dentistry professor emeritus Dr. Kunio Komiyama and his colleague Dr. Gerry Uswak are recruiting 120 teens willing to brush with a prototype light-powered toothbrush and sit in a dentist’s chair for a few extra inspections. The manufacturer, the Shiken company of Japan, is paying the researchers to investigate whether the brush, which causes a chemical reaction in the mouth, does a better job of eliminating plaque and bacteria than a conventional toothbrush.

Komiyama’s first model, which was described 15 years ago in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology, contained a titanium dioxide rod in the neck of the brush, just below the nylon bristles. It works when light shines on the wet rod, releasing electrons. Those electrons react with acid in the mouth, which helps break down plaque. No toothpaste is required.

Now Komiyama’s back with a newer model, the Soladey-J3X, which he says packs twice the chemical punch compared to the original. Protruding from the base of the brush is a solar panel, which transmits electrons to the top of the toothbrush through a lead wire. It won’t work in the dark, though – the brush needs about as much light as a solar-powered calculator would to operate.

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Read more: Solar Powered Toothbrush Could Make Toothpaste Obsolete | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World

 

Floss To Remember

May 12, 2010

Having trouble remembering to floss? It may be more than just trying to develop a good habit that will save your teeth! Thanks to Courtney “CoCo” Malenius, who brought to our attention a Channel 7/ABC report entitled “Floss to Remember,” research suggests that forgetting can be contributed to by gum disease.

It seems that staying away from gum disease bacteria keeps more than your teeth. The bacteria that causes gum disease triggers your body’s inflammatory process that can affect your systemic health including your memory! Researchers looked at men and women over 60, and those who scored lowest on tests of math and memory had been exposed to gum disease bacteria. These low score results were comparable to scores by those with early Alzheimer’s Disease. The inflammatory bacteria causes blood vessels to stiffen, which is linked to cardiac and memory problems.

More Reasons Not To Use Oral Barbells To Exercise tongue Muscles

April 27, 2010

More on Oral Barbells

Athletes who always seem to be health conscious can’t seem to understand the risks of oral piercings and jewelry. According to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), oral piercing and tongue jewelry place athletes at risk for serious medical and dental consequences.

“For years, we have been urging athletes to wear mouthguards when they are playing,” says AGD spokesperson Bruce DeGinder, DDS, MAGD. “Now we have to tell them to take the barbell out of their tongues.”

The AGD published an article in the March/April 2002 issue of General Dentistry ( the Academy’s peer-reviewed, clinical journal), one out of every five oral piercings results in infection from contaminated puncture wounds. They found athletes are more susceptible than the average person to develop infections due to the increased blood flow and breathing rate involved in vigorous exercise, as well as the increased chance of bleeding from a contact injury, both of which can spread infection more quickly.

In a survey of pediatric dentists, 24% reported that they had treated patients with complications resulting from oral piercing. Common problems included bleeding, airway restriction, and chemical burns caused by post-piercing care products. Damage to the teeth and gums is of course another common problem.

According to Suzann P. McGeary, DDS, the risks and dangers of oral jewelry and piercings are even higher for athletes. “The athlete who participates in contact sports may be particularly susceptible to airway restriction because an impact may dislodge the tongue jewelry, which could be inhaled. It also could be swallowed, which could cause injury to the gastrointestinal tract.”

Damage to teeth by tongue jewelry is another danger intensified by participating in contact sports. “We have seen so many cracks and fractures in teeth caused by clicking, tapping or rubbing the jewelry on them that it has gotten its own name – the wrecking ball fracture,” says Dr. DeGinder. “The danger of this is much higher on the playing field.” According to Dr. McGeary, the jewelry can also injure the gums and other soft tissue, as well as interfere with proper salivary functioning, conditions that decrease the body’s defenses against infection and disease.

Dr. DeGinder’s first suggestion regarding oral piercing is, “Don’t do it.”

Mixing tongue jewelry and a mouthguard is a particularly bad combination, says Dr. McGeary. “The jewelry may interfere with the mouthguard and cause increased salivary flow and gagging or inhibit breathing or speech.”

“Remove the tongue jewelry – not the mouthguard,” says Dr. McGeary.
Info from the AGD

Researchers Find Tongue Piercing Could Lead To Gum and Tooth Problems

April 18, 2010

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As many of my patients have heard in my office, Why in the world would you put something in your tongue that can only cause you harm? Well I went searching for information to back this up and here’s some things that I found: A study in 2002 published in the JOURNAL OF PERIODONTOLOGY found that extended wear of tongue jewelry (barbell-type) could increase your chance of gum recession and tooth chipping.. Study Abstract *

Researchers at Loma Linda University School of Dentistry and Ohio State University College of Dentistry examined and surveyed 52 young adults with pierced tongues. They found gum recession in 35 percent of subjects with pierced tongues for four or more years, and in 50 percent wearing long-stemmed barbells for two or more years.

“During tongue movement, long-stem barbells are more likely to reach and damage the gums than short barbells,” said Dr. Dimitris Tatakis, professor of periodontology at the Ohio State University College of Dentistry and coauthor of the study. “Over time, this damage may cause the gums to recede, which can lead to more serious dental/oral complications.”

Additionally, 47 percent of young adults wearing either type of barbell for four or more years had chipped teeth. The prevalence of tooth chipping was significantly greater in those wearing short-stemmed barbells (1/4 inch – 5/8 inch) for four or more years.

Researchers believe tooth chipping is a result of habitual biting of the barbell. “A short barbell is possibly easier to position between teeth, which could be one reason why we are seeing more chipped teeth in this group,” said Tatakis. “Another factor that was not investigated could be the size or material type of the screw caps attached to the barbell.”

Dr. Timothy Roberts from the University of Rochester School of Medicine in New York presented study results on 4,500 adolescents aged 12 to 21 and found that teens with body piercings are more likely to smoke cigarettes, use drugs and exhibit other types of unhealthy behavior. Study findings were presented at the Society of Adolescent Medicine’s annual meeting in Boston.

“Mouth piercings and smoking combined could cause a mouthful of trouble,” said Dr. Kenneth Bueltmann, president of the American Academy of Periodontology. “As a smoker, you are more likely than nonsmokers to have calculus on your teeth, deep pockets between your teeth and gums and loss of the bone and tissue that support your teeth. Combine these problems with gum recession from tongue piercing and you are on your way to having a serious infection called periodontal disease and not to mention a not so cool looking mouth.”

“Given this new information, I strongly recommend discussing potential risk factors with your dentist before mouth piercing,” said Bueltmann. “Additionally, anyone with a pierced mouth should receive a thorough oral examination of their gums and teeth to identify problem areas. Taking precautions now will increase your chance of keeping your teeth for a lifetime instead of needing dentures like many of your grandparents.”

In addition to periodontal diseases (serious bacterial infections that destroy the attachment fibers and supporting bone that hold your teeth in your mouth) tongue piercing may cause other complications such as t ongue swelling, difficulties with chewing, swallowing and speech, increase of saliva flow, localized tissue overgrowth and metal hypersensitivity.

A referral to a periodontist in your area and free brochure samples are available by calling 800-FLOSS-EM or visiting the AAP’s Web site at www.perio.org. Thanks for this info from the site of the Periodontal association.