Grandma’s Nuts

February 29, 2012
   Danny is out with his friends and stops by his grandmother’s house for a visit.
 There’s a bowl of peanuts on the coffee table.
[]
So Danny and his friends start snacking on them.
[]
When they’re ready to leave, his friends say, “Nice  to meet you, ma’am,  And thank you for the peanuts.”
 Then Grandma says,
[]
“You’re  welcome.
Eat all you want…ever since I lost my dentures,
 all I can do is suck the chocolate off ’em.”
1:49 PM (1 hour ago)

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Here are ten wild and crazy dental facts that will make you smile and improve your health as well.

February 16, 2012

 

1) The average human produces 25,000 quarts of saliva in a lifetime. That is enough spit to fill 2 swimming pools!

 

2) You should not keep your toothbrush near a toilet. The airborne particles from the flush can travel up to a distance of 6 feet. Yuck!

 

3) People who drink 3 or more glasses of soda each day have 62% more tooth decay, fillings and tooth loss than others. Put down the pop and sports drinks and pick up some nice fresh water instead.

 

4) In 1994, a prison inmate in West Virginia braided dental floss into a rope, scaled the wall and escaped. (We suggest that you use floss to clean between your teeth instead of climbing prison walls! If you don’t you are missing around 35% of your teeth’s surfaces.)

 

5) You should replace your toothbrush at least every three months, and always after you have an episode of flu, cold or other viral infections. Notorious bacteria can implant themselves on the toothbrush bristles leading to re-infection.

 

6) Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body. However, we do not recommend that you use your pearly whites to open bottle caps!

 

7) The standard advice to “see your dentist twice a year” was actually invented by an ad agency for Pepsodent toothpaste! Your dental professional should recommend the correct schedule for your regular dental visits.

 

8) A recent poll has shown that health professionals (physicians, dentists and nurses) were among the most trusted people in The United States. The least trusted? Lobbyists and congressmen of course!

 

9) According to a recent survey done by Time Magazine, 59% of Americans would rather have a dental appointment than be sitting next to someone talking on a cell phone. Maybe some of us should take a hint!

 

10) Over three out of four people in the United States suffer from some form of gum disease. It is the leading cause of tooth loss in people over age 35. The good news is, in most cases gum disease can be prevented or controlled!

At the office of Dr. Malenius and Davis, we are here for you, and want to help you achieve the best smile possible. If you have any questions about your dental health or need to schedule an appointment, please give us a call today at 1-630-668-6180. We can help you!

 

Also – did you know that we are now on Facebook? Please go to https://www.facebook.com/WheatonDental and “like” us for more dental health tips, community news, contests, special offers at all kinds of other fun stuff!!

Beware Of Valentine’s Day

February 8, 2012

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner, and you may be getting ready for some big fat kisses to come your way.

So even though at the office of Dr. Malenius and Davis we’re concerned about cavities, gum disease, bad breath and lots of saliva, we won’t use this month’s blog entry to gross you out about kissing. But we will tell you some interesting facts that you can tell your kissing partner right after they smack one on you!!

Anthropologists have argued for years about the origin of kissing. Many now believe that it has evolved from the timewhen mothers chewed food for their babies and then went mouth to mouth at feeding time. (Well, okay-we mightgross you out a little bit!) This action became so comforting to babies that the habit continued even after they could chew for themselves, and then developed into a sign of affection.

Nowadays kisses aren’t just about romantic love. Of course parents kiss their children. Worshipper-s-often kiss religious artifacts. Some people kiss the ground when exiting an airplane. And who doesn’t want to have a “boo boo” kissed when they get a bruise?

But February 14th is a day for the romantic kind of kiss, and if you are craving one, there may be a scientific reason.

While this action can promote a psychological response of warmth and affection, it also causes your brain to secretesome important and productive chemicals, such as:

  • Oxytocin, which helps people develop feelings of attachment, devotion and affection for one another
  • Dopamine, which plays a role in the brain’s processing of emotions, pleasure and pain
  • Serotonin, which affects a person’s mood and feelings
  • Adrenaline, which increases heart rate and plays a role in your body’s fight-or-flight response

But along with that, when you kiss, hundreds or even millions of bacterial colonies are transported from one mouth to the other. And let’s face it- no one wants to kiss a person who has poor oral hygiene, bad breath, or just a generally yucky mouth. So let’s start with the basics:

• Make sure you brush at least twice a day with a soft toothbrush and fluoridated toothpaste• Floss once per day – if you have trouble flossing or are not sure how, please ask! We’ll be glad to show you the

ropes.

• Avoid sugary and acid-laden foods such as soft drinks, sports drinks, and candy. (Okay – we won’t tell      anyone ifyou have a tiny bit of candy on Valentine’s Day!)

• Eat a well balanced diet including lean proteins, healthy fats, fruits and vegetables, nuts and fiber.

• If you need to slip in a piece of gum or breath mint, make sure it contains Xylitol, which has been proven to reduce tooth decay.

• Drink plenty of water! This helps to rinse away food particles, and staying hydrated is good for fresh clean breath.

• See you dentist on a regular basis and call immediately if you suspect there are any problems with your oral condition.

At our office, we want you to have a kissable February 14th and a lifetime of excellent dental health. If you have any questions or need to set up an appointment, please give us a call at 1-630-668-6180. We are here for you!

The Sahara Desert And Your Mouth?

June 6, 2011

Do you ever feel like your mouth and The Sahara Desert have something in common?

If so, you are not alone. Over 25 million Americans suffer from dry mouth. And it’s not just the discomfort of dry mouth (called “xerostomia” by dentists) that is the problem; it is often accompanied by trouble chewing and swallowing, difficulty in speaking, a rise in dental cavities and gum disease, and most noticeably to some, bad breath. If people act like there is a fire drill taking place every time you open your mouth, this could be the culprit!

So why do so many of us have what is often referred to as “cottonmouth?”

According to The Food and Drug Administration, over 400 medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, can lead to dry mouth. It’s also caused by mouth breathing, dehydration (drink your water!!), and lack of salivary flow due to aging. In rare instances, dry mouth may be caused by an underlying serious disease – so it is not something to take lightly.

Of course our good old friends (actually enemies) – excessive alcohol consumption and smoking are among the leading causes of this problem, so if you need another reason to put away the cigarettes for good and cut down on the booze, now is a great time!

There are several things you can do to help reduce the symptoms of dry mouth, including:

  • Chewing a sugar-free gum containing Xylitol
  • Drinking plenty of water
  • Breathing through your nose instead of your mouth (easier said than done!)
  • Frequent brushing and rinsing with a fluoride toothpaste and mouth rinse
  • Using a room vaporizer to humidify the air in your home
  • Using an over-the-counter saliva substitute

Since dry mouth can also be a sign of a serious illness AND cause and increase in cavities and gum disease, excellent oral hygiene and regular dental visits are a must. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, please call us immediately at 630-668-6180 for an appointment or visit our website at www.maleniusdental.com. Your health is important to us and we are here to help you.

RELAX

May 19, 2011

We’ve all seen Steve Martin’s crazy sadistic dental performance in the movie  Little Shop of Horrors or heard a friend’s over-inflated version of a bad office visit (usually involving a root canal), but going to the dentist these days really isn’t scary! With all the modem technology and advanced techniques available, a dental visit can be not just painless but actually relaxing! Right? Right!

Like it or not, most of us go to the dentist routinely to keep our teeth and gums healthy because it’s what we’re supposed to do, not because it’s a favorite activity. But did you know that seventy-five percent of the population experience some sort of dental fear and fifteen percent actually avoid going to the dentist altogether due to severe anxiety? Infrequent dental visits or total avoidance can cause severe health problems, even heart disease. This can be a serious problem.

Here at Dr. Malenius and Associates, we take this issue very seriously. We want to make each visit to the dentist as comfortable and stress free as possible. That’s why we do everything we can to soothe and relax you from the minute you walk in the door. We have stereo headphones that let you choose your own music and drown out the background noise. Our up-to-date anesthesia techniques make dental treatment incredibly comfortable. The high-tech laser we use for some procedures can make injections and drilling a thing of the past. And if necessary, we even offer Nitrous Oxide sedation to help you through your visit with less anxiety.

We feel your dental health is so important that we take these extra steps to help you stay as healthy as possible and to make each visit a stress free one. When you leave our office, we are committed to making you smile in every way.

Please give us a call at 630-668-6180 to schedule your next appointment. With your comfort in mind, we will make sure that every visit is a great one!

Solar Powered Dentistry

October 17, 2010

Found this article on the internet and thought it was interesting!!

Solar Powered Toothbrush Could Make Toothpaste Obsolete

by Yuka Yoneda, 08/16/10

solar powered toothbrush, solar toothbrush, Kunio Komiyama, shiken, Soladey-J3X, green gadgets, solar power, green design, eco design, sustainable design, green products

When we first saw this new gadget, we thought “Oh, a mechanical toothbrush powered by the sun.” But that isn’t what this is. Instead of using solar rays to charge itself up, the toothbrush uses them to catalyze a powerful chemical reaction that could leave your mouth way cleaner than regular old brushing does. “You see complete destruction of bacterial cells,” says Kunio Komiyama, the inventor of the device. Oh, and did we mention that no toothpaste is required? Watch out Colgate!

solar powered toothbrush, solar toothbrush, Kunio Komiyama, shiken, Soladey-J3X, green gadgets, solar power, green design, eco design, sustainable design, green products

Mechanical University of Saskatchewan dentistry professor emeritus Dr. Kunio Komiyama and his colleague Dr. Gerry Uswak are recruiting 120 teens willing to brush with a prototype light-powered toothbrush and sit in a dentist’s chair for a few extra inspections. The manufacturer, the Shiken company of Japan, is paying the researchers to investigate whether the brush, which causes a chemical reaction in the mouth, does a better job of eliminating plaque and bacteria than a conventional toothbrush.

Komiyama’s first model, which was described 15 years ago in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology, contained a titanium dioxide rod in the neck of the brush, just below the nylon bristles. It works when light shines on the wet rod, releasing electrons. Those electrons react with acid in the mouth, which helps break down plaque. No toothpaste is required.

Now Komiyama’s back with a newer model, the Soladey-J3X, which he says packs twice the chemical punch compared to the original. Protruding from the base of the brush is a solar panel, which transmits electrons to the top of the toothbrush through a lead wire. It won’t work in the dark, though – the brush needs about as much light as a solar-powered calculator would to operate.

Vi

Read more: Solar Powered Toothbrush Could Make Toothpaste Obsolete | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World

 

3 Decay Promoting Drinks Americans Should Avoid

July 26, 2010


Tooth decay has become a chronic problem in the United States quite often due to the sugary, decay-causing drinks Americans consume. If you want to spend less time at the dentist, here are 3 drinks that you may want to avoid in order to preserve your teeth.

Soda

If you are trying to keep your teeth decay free, sodas are your #1 enemy! Soda is a cornucopia of harmful ingredients waiting to attack your tooth enamel. The main decay causing factors in soda are its acid content, phosphorus content, caffeine and sugar. Some sodas contain as much acid as a battery, and drinking sodas over a long period of time slowly breaks down the enamel of your teeth! The phosphoric acid and caffeine in soda are also culprits for enamel breakdown. Although phosphorus is a necessary element in your bones, too much phosphorus can lead to bone loss, and caffeine limits calcium absorption by your teeth.

The sugar in sodas attaches to bacteria and makes it stick to the surface of your enamel and fuels their metabolism which releases acid byproducts which can cause serious damage to your teeth. Limiting or eliminating sodas from your diet is good for your overall health, but especially good for your bones and teeth. Another helpful tip is to drink your soda through a straw to try and l keep these harmful elements off your teeth as much as possible. If you are experiencing extensive tooth decay due to soda consumption, be sure to get the professional dental care you need to address the decay and avoid more expensive and extensive treatment like root canals and crowns.

Sports Drinks

Different studies show multiple results regarding sports drinks and tooth decay. There are varying factors suchas when and how often you consume these drinks. The acidity and sugar of sports drinks are similar to soda in their affect on your mouth. However, the amount of saliva produced while you are drinking sports drinks will greatly alter the affect the drink has on your teeth. If you are sipping a sports drink at your leisure, during a sports activity, or during a bike ride, your teeth will experience greater affects of decay than consuming a sports drink with your meal. (The stimulus of chewing your food will increase your saliva flow, reducing the decay effects of these acidic and sugary drinks.)

Wine

White wine has a high acid content and wears away at tooth enamel, very similar to the way affect fruit juice affects your teeth. Although red wines are more apt to leave your teeth stained, they tend to be less acidic and damge your teeth less. Prolonged exposure of your teeth to wine (because wine is typically sipped), decreases the pH balance of your mouth and gives bacteria a favorable environment to grow. If you choose to drink wine, make sure that you eat at the same time and eat foods rich in calcium, such as cheese, to help counter the effects of this acid.

Removing these 3 drinks from your diet is a great way help keep out of the dentist’s chair as much as possible. However, if you already have cavities due to these drinks, you best not wait and get these problems fixed to avoid even greater expense.

Malpractice is driving doctors to more fullfilling careers!!! A JOKE

June 22, 2010
A gynecologist had become fed up with malpractice insurance and HMO paperwork, and was burned out. Hoping to try another career where skillful hands would be beneficial, he decided to become a mechanic. He went to the local technical college, signed up for evening classes, attended diligently, and learned all he could.
When the time of the practical exam approached, the gynecologist prepared carefully for weeks, and completed the exam with tremendous skill. When the results came back, he was surprised to find that he had obtained a score of 150%. Fearing an error, he called the Instructor, saying, “I don’t want to appear ungrateful for such an outstanding result, but I wonder if there is an error in the grade?”
“The instructor said, “During the exam, you took the engine apart perfectly, which was worth 50% of the total mark. You put the engine back together again perfectly, which is also worth 50% of the mark.” After a pause, the instructor added, “I gave you an extra 50% because you did it all through the muffler, which I’ve never seen done in my entire career”.

Robin Williams is often nuttier than peanut butter but this makes sense

June 22, 2010
HE MADE THIS SPEECH IN NEW YORK …
The Plan!

?
Robin Williams, wearing a shirt that says,
‘I love  New York  ‘ in Arabic.

You gotta love Robin Williams….


Even if he’s nuts!
Leave it to Robin Williams to come up with the perfect plan. What we need now is for our UN Ambassador to stand up and repeat this message.

Robin Williams’ plan…


(Hard to argue with this logic!)

‘I see a lot of people yelling for peace, but I have not heard of a plan for peace.
So, here’s one plan.’

1) ‘The US will apologize to the world for our ‘interference’ in their affairs, past & present. You know, Hitler, Mussolini, Stalin, Tojo, Noriega, Milosevic, Hussein, and the rest of those ‘good ‘ole’ boys’, we will never ‘interfere’ again.

2) We will withdraw our troops from all over the world, starting with  Germany  ,  South Korea  , the  Middle East , and thePhilippines . They don’t want us there.
We would station troops at our borders.
No one allowed sneaking through holes in the fence.

3) All illegal aliens have 90 days to get their affairs together and leave. We’ll give them a free trip home. After 90 days, the remainder will be gathered up and deported immediately, regardless of whom or where they are. They’re illegal!!!
France will welcome them.

4) All future visitors will be thoroughly checked and limited to 90 days, unless given a special permit!!!! No one from a terrorist nation will be allowed in.. If you don’t like it there, change it yourself and don’t hide here. Asylum would never be available to anyone. We don’t need any more cab drivers or 7-11 cashiers.

5) No foreign ‘students’ over age 21. The older ones are the bombers. If they don’t attend classes, they get a ‘D’ and it’s back home baby.

6) The US will make a strong effort to become self-sufficient energy wise. This will include developing nonpolluting sources of energy but will require a temporary drilling of oil in the Alaskan wilderness.
The caribou will have to cope for a while

7) Offer  Saudi Arabia  and other oil producing countries $10 a barrel for their oil. If they don’t like it, we go someplace else. They can go somewhere else to sell their production. (About a week of the wells filling up the storage sites would be enough.)

8) If there is a famine or other natural catastrophe in the world, we will not ‘interfere.’ They can pray to Allah or whomever, for seeds, rain, cement or whatever they need. Besides most of what we give them is stolen or given to the army. The people who need it most get very little, if anything.

9) Ship the UN Headquarters to an isolated island someplace. We don’t need the spies and fair weather friends here. Besides, the building would make a good homeless shelter or lockup for illegal aliens.

10) All Americans must go to charm and beauty school.. That way, no one can call us ‘Ugly Americans’ any longer.
The Language we speak is ENGLISH… learn it… or LEAVE…


Now, isn’t that a winner of a plan?

‘The Statue of Liberty is no longer saying ‘Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses.’
She’s got a baseball bat and she’s yelling, ‘You want a piece of me?’

If you agree with the above, forward it to friends… If not, and I would be amazed, DELETE it!!

Up the Creek without A Dentist!!!

May 17, 2010

You’re sitting on the bank of a slow moving river at sunset, enjoying a delightful shore side dinner when you suddenly bite down hard on an unsuspected piece of bone, hear a loud crack, and immediately feel excruciating pain from a broken tooth. Surprisingly, this occurs quite often in the backcountry.
Dental emergencies can occur at home or in the wilderness without warning and can incapacitate you instanly. Around the house you may be able to get a hold of a dentist immediately, but on the weekend, or in new area, or especially in the wilderness you may be on your own for the a while.

Natural disasters such as the earthquakes in Haiti, foods, fires, human disasters caused by terrorism and riots, or just plain everyday problems in remote areas cause problems due to the lack of electricity which needed for a dental office to operate.. Hospitals rarely have any dental services, so you could be on your own for hours or days.
Very rarely is dental first aid taught so here is some information intended to help you in an emergency situation when no professional dental help is available. It is not intended to be a substitute for proper dental care.
Prevention:
All my life, I’ve spent as much time as possible outdoors, either photographing nature, fishing, camping, hunting, or playing sports. From experience I can tell you nothing ruins an extended trip, outdoor adventure, or pleasant day away than dental pain. The best insurance against such disaster is simple home care, regular dental checkups, and treatment if necessary. This advice is sound for everyone, whether traveling or staying at home. Regular cleanings help prevent gum infections, fillings that are starting to fail can be replaced before suddenly breaking at the wrong time and small painless cavities in teeth can be repaired before they become deep and painful.
Proper home care of your teeth is very important. Brush and floss your teeth regularly to avoid cavities and gum infections. In times of crisis, brushing and flossing are the last things on your mind, and the result is gingivitis ( gum infections) are more frequent during times of emotional and physical stress.
Brushing with a toothbrush with toothpaste is the simplest way to clean your teeth. In an emergency survival situation you have to find a temporary way to clean your teeth. A wash cloth or towel can be used to remove the soft, sticky, bacteria-laden plaque that develops on the surface of your teeth. The end of a thin green twig from a tree or bush can be chewed until it is soft and fibrous and this end can be used to clean the teeth and gums. You can even use your finger if nothing else is available.

A Dental First Aid Kit:

It’s easy to add a few items to your first aid kit to use when traveling or in the outdoors. I recommend the following:
– Dental floss

  • – Soft dental or orthodontic wax
  • – Cotton pellets
  • -Tempanol or Cavit temporary filling materia
  • – Oil of Clove (Eugenol)
  • -OralJel (benzocaine)
  • – Dent’s Toothache Drops (Eugenol and Benzocaine)
  • – Small dental tweezers
  • – Protective gloves
  • – Denture adhesive crème

Remember it’s always a good idea to wear gloves when working in the mouth if available to help prevent the spread of germs. cloves (eugenol)

You’re sitting on the bank of a slow moving river at sunset, enjoying a delightful shore side dinner when you suddenly bite down hard on an unsuspected piece of bone, hear a loud crack, and immediately feel excruciating pain from a broken tooth. Surprisingly, this occurs quite often in the backcountry.
Dental emergencies can occur at home or in the wilderness without warning and can incapacitate you instanly. Around the house you may be able to get a hold of a dentist immediately, but on the weekend, or in new area, or especially in the wilderness you may be on your own for the a while.

Natural disasters such as the earthquakes in Haiti, foods, fires, human disasters caused by terrorism and riots, or just plain everyday problems in remote areas cause problems due to the lack of electricity which needed for a dental office to operate.. Hospitals rarely have any dental services, so you could be on your own for hours or days.
Very rarely is dental first aid taught so here is some information intended to help you in an emergency situation when no professional dental help is available. It is not intended to be a substitute for proper dental care.

Prevention:
All my life, I’ve spent as much time as possible outdoors, either photographing nature, fishing, camping, hunting, or playing sports. From experience I can tell you nothing ruins an extended trip, outdoor adventure, or pleasant day away than dental pain. The best insurance against such disaster is simple home care, regular dental checkups, and treatment if necessary. This advice is sound for everyone, whether traveling or staying at home. Regular cleanings help prevent gum infections, fillings that are starting to fail can be replaced before suddenly breaking at the wrong time and small painless cavities in teeth can be repaired before they become deep and painful.
Proper home care of your teeth is very important. Brush and floss your teeth regularly to avoid cavities and gum infections. In times of crisis, brushing and flossing are the last things on your mind, and the result is gingivitis ( gum infections) are more frequent during times of emotional and physical stress.
Brushing with a toothbrush with toothpaste is the simplest way to clean your teeth. In an emergency survival situation you have to find a temporary way to clean your teeth. A wash cloth or towel can be used to remove the soft, sticky, bacteria-laden plaque that develops on the surface of your teeth. The end of a thin green twig from a tree or bush can be chewed until it is soft and fibrous and this end can be used to clean the teeth and gums. You can even use your finger if nothing else is available.

Toothache:
A toothache is caused by the inflammation of the central nerve inside a tooth (called the dental pulp). Decay (bacterial infection) from a cavity that extends into the pulp can cause a toothache, as can a fracture of the tooth. If infection occurs in the pulp, it can cause excruciating pain and can spread through the root of the tooth into the jaw causing an abscess.
Symptoms of a toothache include pain in an isolated tooth or spread over several teeth. At first, the pain may be mild, intermittent, and made worse with hot or cold temperature changes caused by food or drink, cold air, orby the biting pressure. As it progresses, the pain may become constant, excruciating, and incapacitating.
Sometimes, an abscessed tooth will slowly drain infection into a large cavity. After a meal, when food is packed into the cavity, the drainage may be blocked and the pressure will increase in the tooth causing the toothache to become worse until the food is cleaned out.
Treatment of a toothache consists of locating the painful tooth and checking for any obvious cavity or fracture. Clean out any food or debris with a toothbrush, toothpick, or similar tool. Then soak a small cotton pellet or, if not available, a small piece of cloth, in a topical anesthetic, such as a eugenol o ra benzocaine solution. This should then be placed in the cavity. A small pair of dental tweezers, like the type provided in commercial toothache kits, tick removing tweezers, or a small instrument like a toothpick is helpful in placing the cotton. This topical anesthetic should give quick relief. Placing aspirin on the gums next to the tooth can cause even greater pain by causing a chemical burn of the tissue and is strongly advised against.
The type of topical anesthetic used is important. Dentists use pure eugenol (oil of clove) for emergency treatment of toothaches because it is long-lasting. Oil of cloves is available without prescription at pharmacies and some health food stores. Be careful, however, as pure oil of cloves can cause chemical burns to the mouth and tongue if it gets off the tooth just like aspirin.
Commercial toothache medications that are available include Red Cross Toothache Medicine containing 85% eugenol, Dent’s Toothache Drops containing benzocaine and eugenol, and Orajel containing benzocaine. Some products include the small dental tweezers and cotton pellets that you will need.
Once the medicated cotton is in place, cover it with a temporary filling material, such as Tempanol or Cavit to prevent it from falling out. These are all soft, putty-like materials that can be molded into the cavity. If they are not available, soft dental wax or softened wax from a candle can be used. If a candle is used, melt some wax and let it cool until it is pliable before placing in the mouth.
A pain medication, such as 800mg Motrin every 8 hours, or prescription pain medicines, such as Vicodin, 1-2 every four to six hours, can be used if available. Once again, Do Not Place Aspirin On The Gum next to a painful tooth. Not only doesn’t it help, it causes a large, painful burn to the gum tissue.
Seek help from a dentist immediately. If it takes some time to find one, it may be necessary to replace the cotton pellet with another freshly soaked in topical anesthetic.

Gingivitis:

Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums (gingiva) most commonly due to inadequate tooth brushing and lack of flossing. Gums become red, swollen, and may bleed while brushing the teeth. It is largely preventable by good oral hygiene and regular dental check-ups. When gingivitis causes pain and bleeding in the field, improve oral hygiene by brushing three times per day, followed by warm salt-water rinses. Over-the-counter anti-bacterial mouthwashes may also help.

Dental abscess:

An infected tooth or gum infection (gingival infection) can cause a dental abscess. Food lodged between the teeth can also do so if not removed with dental floss.
Abscesses are normally located next to the offending tooth and cause pain and swelling. They can spread beyond the tooth to the face, floor of the mouth, or neck and it may be difficult to open the mouth or swallow. On rare occasions, dental abscesses can become life-threatening by getting so large that they block breathing or by causing fever or generalized infection throughout the body. Deal with any abscess immediately.
Antibiotics are required to treat abscesses. Go to a dentist immediately. If one is not available or if there is severe swelling go to a physician or hospital emergency room. When dental or medical help is not available and the situation is an emergency, oral antibiotics, such as amoxicillan 500 mg every six hours, can be given, after making sure the person is not allergic to the medication.
Warm salt-water rinses of the mouth every four hours may help the abscess to spontaneously drain, giving some relief of the pain. Do not place hot packs to the outside of the face unless directed to by your dentist or physician. Heat can spread the infection outward. Pain medications may be used as described above.
In the rare situation where no professional help is expected to be available for some time and no antibiotics are available, an abscess that is localized next to a tooth can be drained to remove the pus. A sterile scalpel, needle, or a debarbed fishhook ( disinfected by heating with a match) may be used to puncture the abscess. It will be painful to do, but there should be immediate relief from the abscess.

Broken filling or lost crown:

Biting down on candy, nuts, ice cubes, and other hard or sticky foods are common ways to break a tooth or filling. If the tooth is not painful, be careful not to break it further and see a dentist as soon as possible.
A temporary filling can be placed to prevent the tooth from becoming sensitive to hot or cold and to avoid food from packing into the void. Place a small amount of a temporary filling material, such as Tempanol or Cavit, into the hole in the tooth using a dental instrument or a flat tool such as the blade of a knife, popsicle stick, or similar tools. Bite down on the temporary material to form it to your bite and then have them open your mouth and remove any excess material. These materials will harden some and remain in place. Soft wax also can be used in the same manner as filling a cavity described above.
Crowns (caps) can be pulled off teeth by sticky foods, such as caramel and salt-water taffy. If the tooth is not sensitive to hot or cold, save the crown and see a dentist as soon as convenient.
If the tooth is so sensitive that it prevents the person from eating, it may be necessary to replace it temporarily. Do this only if really necessary, as this is only a temporary solution and there is a risk that the crown could come off and be swallowed. Clean out any dry cement or material from the inside of the crown with a dental instrument or knife. Place a thin layer of temporary filling material, denture adhesive, or even a thick mixture of water and flour inside the crown. Making sure the crown is aligned properly on the tooth, have the person gently bite down to seat the crown all the way and see a dentist as soon as possible.

Injuries to teeth:

A fall or blow to the mouth can injure teeth, most commonly the upper front teeth. Teeth may be in a normal position, but loose when touched, may be partially out of the socket or pushed back, or may be completely knocked out. Unless it is completely knocked out, the first thing you should do is see a dentist.
When one is not available within a reasonable time, a tooth that is out of place may be repositioned with steady, gentle pressure to bring it back into proper position. If it is very loose, gently biting on a piece of gauze can help hold it in place. A dentist should be seen as soon as possible, as the tooth may need to be splinted to hold it in place until healing occurs.
When a tooth is completely knocked out (avulsed), what you do in the first 30 minutes determines whether the tooth can be saved. The ligaments that hold a tooth into the jaw are torn along with the nerve and blood vessels when it is knocked out of its socket and it is essentially a “dead tooth.” When re-implanted into the tooth socket within 30 minutes the body will usually accept it and the ligaments will reattach. While it will require a root canal to remove the dead nerve and blood vessels, it will be a functioning tooth.
Over 30 minutes before it is re-implanted and the body treats it like foreign material and slowly dissolves the root over a period of weeks to months. Often the tooth needs to be extracted.
To treat an avulsed tooth, find the tooth on the ground or in the person’s mouth. If the socket is bleeding, have the person bite down on gauze pads placed over the top of the socket. A moistened non-herbal tea bag may also be used.
Check the tooth to make sure it is whole and not broken. Handling the tooth only by the crown, the part that normally shows in the mouth, clean off any dirt or debris by gently rinsing the tooth with sterile saline, disinfected water, or milk. It is important that you do not touch the thin, whitish colored layer of soft tissue covering the root. This is the important layer of periodontal ligament that will allow the tooth to reattach. Replace the tooth into the tooth socket and with gentle, steady pressure push it into place. Have the person bite down lightly on a piece of gauze to hold it in place and see a dentist immediately to have the tooth stabilized.
If a tooth cannot be immediately re-implanted, it should be wrapped in gauze and soaked in a container of sterile saline solution, milk, or the injured person’s saliva while they are immediately taken to a dentist. Some recommend keeping the tooth moist by placing it in the victim’s mouth. This does work, but the tooth can also accidentally be swallowed.
Dental emergencies are more common than most people realize. While you most often will be able to obtain help from a dentist, there are times when you may be on your own. Prevention, knowledge, and a few important items in a dental first aid kit can save you and your family during these times
– OralJel (benzocaine)
– Dent’s Toothache Drops (Eugenol and Benzocaine)
– Small dental tweezers
– Protective gloves
– Denture adhesive crème
Remember it’s always a good idea to wear gloves when working in the mouth if available to help prevent the spread of germs.

Toothache:

A toothache is caused by the inflammation of the central nerve inside a tooth (called the dental pulp). Decay (bacterial infection) from a cavity that extends into the pulp can cause a toothache, as can a fracture of the tooth. If infection occurs in the pulp, it can cause excruciating pain and can spread through the root of the tooth into the jaw causing an abscess.
Symptoms of a toothache include pain in an isolated tooth or spread over several teeth. At first, the pain may be mild, intermittent, and made worse with hot or cold temperature changes caused by food or drink, cold air, orby the biting pressure. As it progresses, the pain may become constant, excruciating, and incapacitating.
Sometimes, an abscessed tooth will slowly drain infection into a large cavity. After a meal, when food is packed into the cavity, the drainage may be blocked and the pressure will increase in the tooth causing the toothache to become worse until the food is cleaned out.
Treatment of a toothache consists of locating the painful tooth and checking for any obvious cavity or fracture. Clean out any food or debris with a toothbrush, toothpick, or similar tool. Then soak a small cotton pellet or, if not available, a small piece of cloth, in a topical anesthetic, such as a eugenol o ra benzocaine solution. This should then be placed in the cavity. A small pair of dental tweezers, like the type provided in commercial toothache kits, tick removing tweezers, or a small instrument like a toothpick is helpful in placing the cotton. This topical anesthetic should give quick relief. Placing aspirin on the gums next to the tooth can cause even greater pain by causing a chemical burn of the tissue and is strongly advised against.
The type of topical anesthetic used is important. Dentists use pure eugenol (oil of clove) for emergency treatment of toothaches because it is long-lasting. Oil of cloves is available without prescription at pharmacies and some health food stores. Be careful, however, as pure oil of cloves can cause chemical burns to the mouth and tongue if it gets off the tooth just like aspirin.
Commercial toothache medications that are available include Red Cross Toothache Medicine containing 85% eugenol, Dent’s Toothache Drops containing benzocaine and eugenol, and Orajel containing benzocaine. Some products include the small dental tweezers and cotton pellets that you will need.
Once the medicated cotton is in place, cover it with a temporary filling material, such as Tempanol or Cavit to prevent it from falling out. These are all soft, putty-like materials that can be molded into the cavity. If they are not available, soft dental wax or softened wax from a candle can be used. If a candle is used, melt some wax and let it cool until it is pliable before placing in the mouth.
A pain medication, such as 800mg Motrin every 8 hours, or prescription pain medicines, such as Vicodin, 1-2 every four to six hours, can be used if available. Once again, Do Not Place Aspirin On The Gum next to a painful tooth. Not only doesn’t it help, it causes a large, painful burn to the gum tissue.
Seek help from a dentist immediately. If it takes some time to find one, it may be necessary to replace the cotton pellet with another freshly soaked in topical anesthetic.

Gingivitis:

Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums (gingiva) most commonly due to inadequate tooth brushing and lack of flossing. Gums become red, swollen, and may bleed while brushing the teeth. It is largely preventable by good oral hygiene and regular dental check-ups. When gingivitis causes pain and bleeding in the field, improve oral hygiene by brushing three times per day, followed by warm salt-water rinses. Over-the-counter anti-bacterial mouthwashes may also help.
Dental abscess
An infected tooth or gum infection (gingival infection) can cause a dental abscess. Food lodged between the teeth can also do so if not removed with dental floss.
Abscesses are normally located next to the offending tooth and cause pain and swelling. They can spread beyond the tooth to the face, floor of the mouth, or neck and it may be difficult to open the mouth or swallow. On rare occasions, dental abscesses can become life-threatening by getting so large that they block breathing or by causing fever or generalized infection throughout the body. Deal with any abscess immediately.
Antibiotics are required to treat abscesses. Go to a dentist immediately. If one is not available or if there is severe swelling go to a physician or hospital emergency room. When dental or medical help is not available and the situation is an emergency, oral antibiotics, such as amoxicillan 500 mg every six hours, can be given, after making sure the person is not allergic to the medication.
Warm salt-water rinses of the mouth every four hours may help the abscess to spontaneously drain, giving some relief of the pain. Do not place hot packs to the outside of the face unless directed to by your dentist or physician. Heat can spread the infection outward. Pain medications may be used as described above.
In the rare situation where no professional help is expected to be available for some time and no antibiotics are available, an abscess that is localized next to a tooth can be drained to remove the pus. A sterile scalpel, needle, or a debarbed fishhook ( disinfected by heating with a match) may be used to puncture the abscess. It will be painful to do, but there should be immediate relief from the abscess.

Broken filling or lost crown:

Biting down on candy, nuts, ice cubes, and other hard or sticky foods are common ways to break a tooth or filling. If the tooth is not painful, be careful not to break it further and see a dentist as soon as possible.
A temporary filling can be placed to prevent the tooth from becoming sensitive to hot or cold and to avoid food from packing into the void. Place a small amount of a temporary filling material, such as Tempanol or Cavit, into the hole in the tooth using a dental instrument or a flat tool such as the blade of a knife, popsicle stick, or similar tools. Bite down on the temporary material to form it to your bite and then have them open your mouth and remove any excess material. These materials will harden some and remain in place. Soft wax also can be used in the same manner as filling a cavity described above.
Crowns (caps) can be pulled off teeth by sticky foods, such as caramel and salt-water taffy. If the tooth is not sensitive to hot or cold, save the crown and see a dentist as soon as convenient.
If the tooth is so sensitive that it prevents the person from eating, it may be necessary to replace it temporarily. Do this only if really necessary, as this is only a temporary solution and there is a risk that the crown could come off and be swallowed. Clean out any dry cement or material from the inside of the crown with a dental instrument or knife. Place a thin layer of temporary filling material, denture adhesive, or even a thick mixture of water and flour inside the crown. Making sure the crown is aligned properly on the tooth, have the person gently bite down to seat the crown all the way and see a dentist as soon as possible.

Injuries to teeth:

A fall or blow to the mouth can injure teeth, most commonly the upper front teeth. Teeth may be in a normal position, but loose when touched, may be partially out of the socket or pushed back, or may be completely knocked out. Unless it is completely knocked out, the first thing you should do is see a dentist.
When one is not available within a reasonable time, a tooth that is out of place may be repositioned with steady, gentle pressure to bring it back into proper position. If it is very loose, gently biting on a piece of gauze can help hold it in place. A dentist should be seen as soon as possible, as the tooth may need to be splinted to hold it in place until healing occurs.
When a tooth is completely knocked out (avulsed), what you do in the first 30 minutes determines whether the tooth can be saved. The ligaments that hold a tooth into the jaw are torn along with the nerve and blood vessels when it is knocked out of its socket and it is essentially a “dead tooth.” When re-implanted into the tooth socket within 30 minutes the body will usually accept it and the ligaments will reattach. While it will require a root canal to remove the dead nerve and blood vessels, it will be a functioning tooth.
Over 30 minutes before it is re-implanted and the body treats it like foreign material and slowly dissolves the root over a period of weeks to months. Often the tooth needs to be extracted.
To treat an avulsed tooth, find the tooth on the ground or in the person’s mouth. If the socket is bleeding, have the person bite down on gauze pads placed over the top of the socket. A moistened non-herbal tea bag may also be used.
Check the tooth to make sure it is whole and not broken. Handling the tooth only by the crown, the part that normally shows in the mouth, clean off any dirt or debris by gently rinsing the tooth with sterile saline, disinfected water, or milk. It is important that you do not touch the thin, whitish colored layer of soft tissue covering the root. This is the important layer of periodontal ligament that will allow the tooth to reattach. Replace the tooth into the tooth socket and with gentle, steady pressure push it into place. Have the person bite down lightly on a piece of gauze to hold it in place and see a dentist immediately to have the tooth stabilized.
If a tooth cannot be immediately re-implanted, it should be wrapped in gauze and soaked in a container of sterile saline solution, milk, or the injured person’s saliva while they are immediately taken to a dentist. Some recommend keeping the tooth moist by placing it in the victim’s mouth. This does work, but the tooth can also accidentally be swallowed.
Dental emergencies are more common than most people realize. While you most often will be able to obtain help from a dentist, there are times when you may be on your own. Prevention, knowledge, and a few important items in a dental first aid kit can save you and your family during these times